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Infrastructure charges and trunk infrastructure

Council levies infrastructure charges as part of the development assessment process. These charges apply when a subdivision (reconfiguring a lot), material change of use or building work generates additional demand on trunk infrastructure networks.

 

Find detailed information about infrastructure charges below or download and print the information in a paper copy fact sheet here.

  • What are infrastructure charges?

    Infrastructure charges are fees that council usually collects as part of the development assessment process.

    The fees contribute towards capital works of expanding, maintaining or replacing public trunk infrastructure. Hence, they are a means to offset a development’s additional demands on the infrastructure.

    The charges are a requirement under Queensland planning legislation and any development may be subject to them.

    Council has adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolutions in accordance with the requirements of the Planning Act 2016.

    Charges Resolution 12.2 (2017) applies to all applications lodged under the Central Highlands Regional Council Planning Scheme 2016.

  • What is trunk infrastructure?

    Trunk infrastructure, also known as highorder infrastructure, services multiple users and the public. It is classified into five categories;

    • water supply
    • sewerage
    • transport
    • stormwater
    • public parks and community land.

    It is identified in the Local Government Infrastructure Plan Part 4 of the Central Highlands Regional Council Planning Scheme 2016.

  • When do infrastructure charges apply?

    Infrastructure charges apply to developments that create additional demands on trunk infrastructure networks. Usually this includes reconfiguring a lot (subdivisions), material change of use or building work.

    There are some exceptions such as

    • boundary realignments
    • temporary developments
    • developments that do not create additional demand on trunk infrastructure, where the existing use of the site is lawful
    • developments with prior payments. For example, construction of a dwelling house on a vacant lot where the developer of the estate has already paid infrastructure charges when it was subdivided

    Infrastructure charges may also apply to developments that do not require council approval (accepted developments). In this case, council will issue an infrastructure charges notice after a building approval has been issued. Whilst this is uncommon, developers should contact council to discuss their proposal.

  • How are infrastructure charges calculated?

    Infrastructure charges are usually calculated during the development approval process and are based on the development’s additional demand on trunk infrastructure.

    The calculation considers the following attributes of the development:

    Location and site, for example residential or non-residential zoning and what charge areas apply.

    Development type and land use, for example subdivision, dwelling house, motel, commercial office, industry, essential services.

    Development size and scale, for example the number of units in an accommodation facility or the gross floor area of a warehouse.

    Charges for residential development vary according to the additional number of dwellings, units, suites and bedrooms.

    Charges for non-residential development consider and depend on the additional gross floor area and the impervious area of the development site once complete

    The impervious area includes sealed and covered areas (asphalt or concrete) that generate run-off to stormwater drains.

  • When are infrastructure charges due?

    The due date of infrastructure charges is outlined in each individual payment notice, and depends on the type of development.

    The Queensland planning legislation outlines the due dates as follows, unless otherwise stated in the payment notice.

    Type of development Infrastructure charges due
    Reconfiguring a lot (subdivision) Before endorsement of the survey plan
    Material change of use Whichever occurs first:

    Before compliance certificate is issued, or before the change of use commences.

    Building work Before final inspection or building classification certificates are issued.
  • Who pays infrastructure charges?

    Infrastructure charges and development approvals attach to the land and are binding on the land and its owner’s successors in title. Hence, even if someone did not own the property at the time the charges were levied, new owners are responsible to pay any outstanding infrastructure charges.

  • Infrastructure charges recovery

    From time to time, council undertakes an audit of infrastructure charges to determine those applications where infrastructure charges have not been paid.

    This includes determining the currency period of each approval, and whether there is any evidence which would suggest that the development has commenced.

    When unable to confirm if an approval has commenced, a site inspection is required to further determine which approvals have lapsed, commenced or remain current.

    Thereafter, council will carry out a charges recovery project whereby it will issue correspondence to land owners to pay the charges.

    First notice

    For approvals that council identifies as commenced, it will issue a notice advising the original applicant and/ or land owner of their outstanding levied infrastructure charges payable to council. The notice will include the development approval and charges notice.

    It may provide a time frame to arrange payment or details on entering an infrastructure payment agreement.

    Second notice

    If the matter has not been resolved, council will issue a second notice advising the original applicant and/ or land owner of their outstanding charges.

    If full payment is not made within the time frame set out in the correspondence, the unpaid infrastructure charges may be transferred to the property owner’s rates account.

     

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