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Central Highlands Streetscapes

Looking after your footpath and enhancing your neighbourhood

The footpath is, and will mostly remain public land. However, there is a great Australian tradition that sees our residents taking care of the footpath adjoining their property. We support this approach and encourage all residents to improve and maintain their footpaths.

Things to be conscious of

  • The footpath is home to many of  your essential services that connect your neighbourhood. These include water, electricity, communications and sewerage. Prior to undertaking any works on the footpath, please identify these essential services. You can lodge a free enquiry with Dial Before You Dig.
  • Where overhead powerlines exist, it is important that trees or large bushes not be planted under these powerlines. Trees are one of the major causes of power outages that may affect your neighbourhood.
  • In many areas, constructed walkways are in place to enhance the movement  of pedestrians or cyclists. This infrastructure must remain for the benefit of all users. It must not be impeded or obstructed.
  • Council will not provide a service to mow or maintain your footpath as this has a significant impact on the rates that must be paid by all residents.

  • Why care for your footpath?

    You have the ability to improve the appearance of your neighbourhood. More people who take pride in the neighbourhood will improve the liveability of your area and your community.

    Social: Streets where footpaths are planted with trees, shrubs or garden plantings, are more attractive and comfortable to walk around. There can be more social interaction between neighbours.

    Environment: Additional planted areas on the footpath can improve bird habitats, reduce heating affects and improve storm water management.

    Economic: Real estate values can be increased in areas with attractive streetscapes.

  • Before starting

    Pedestrian access must be available. The minimum requirement to be maintained in a typical residential street is 1200 mm. In higher traffic areas, there may be wider constructed paths provided. No impediments or trip hazards can be created within this space.

    Ensure plantings will not impede visibility for pedestrians and vehicles. More stringent controls are in place near intersections.

    There should be clear unobstructed areas where wheelie bins can be placed for collection. This area must be clear of trees and other obstacles. Buildings, fences or other solid structures are not able to be constructed within this public space.

    Avoid species that have sharp leaves, fronds or thorns. Check that trees won’t drop large seed pods or limbs regularly. Trees above 2 metres are to be avoided.

    If you plant species for fruit or other food production, you must understand that this remains a public place and it will not be possible to prevent others from taking from this space. Council will not enter into any disputes of this nature.

  • So what can you do?

    You can plant small trees, shrubs, grass, vegetables and ground covers. The application of mulch, fine decorative gravel or other suitable media can assist with water retention and reduce weed growth.

    Use plants that match your soil type and climatic conditions. A list of suitable plant species is available on council’s website.

    If non-local species are selected, consider varieties that are drought tolerant. Avoid plant species that are considered weeds, invasive in nature, easily spread by birds and animals or likely to damage infrastructure.

    You may install in-ground irrigation at your own cost. The water charges will be at the property owner’s expense.

     

  • You are encouraged to:
    • Plant small trees (maximum height 2 m), shrubs, groundcovers, grass or vegetables.
    • The use of mulch, fine gravel or other suitable media is recommended to reduce water.
    • Mow, trim and attend to your footpath regularly.
    • Encourage your neighbours to improve their footpaths.
    • Be a good neighbour and assist others to enhance your local area.
    • Seek assistance from family, friends or other support networks to maintain your footpath.
  • Which shrubs are recommended?

    Native shrubs:

    • Baeckea Mt Tozer
    • Bauhinia galpinii Grevillea – Coconut Ice, Firesprite, Robyn Gordon and Superb varieties
    • Callistemon Little John
    • Eugenia reinwardtiana
    • Leptospermum flavescens – cardwell
    • Leptospermum petersonii
    • Melaleuca – Claret Tops
    • Melaleuca – Snowflake
    • Melaleuca bracteata cv.
    • Randia fitzalanii
    • Syzygium luehmannii
    • Westringia fruiticosa

    Non-native shrubs:

    • Azelea sp.
    • Brunsfelsia latifolia
    • Clivia miniata
    • Codiaeum variegatum
    • Cordyline sp.
    • Cuphea hyssopifolia
    • Dracaena sp.
    • Gardenia augusta cv.
    • Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
    • Ixora – Coral Fire, Gold Fire, Pink Malay, Prince of Orange, Sunkist and Willamsii varieties
    • Murraya paniculata
    • Nadina domestica
    • Plumbago auriculata
    • Pleomele reflexa cv.
    • Raphiolepis indica
    • Spathiphyllum
  • Which trees are recommended?

    Native trees:

    • Brachychiton acerifolia
    • Brachychiton ruperstris
    • Buckinghamia celsissima
    • Erythrina vespetillio
    • Euodia elleryana
    • Flindersia australis
    • Peltophorum pterocarpum
    • Syzygium australe Cv.
    • Waterhousia floribunda
    • Xanthostemon chysanthus

    Non-native trees:

    • Plumeria obtusa
    • Cassia fistula
    • Lagerstromia speciosa
    • Plumeria sp.
    • Tabebuia argentea
    • Tabebuia palmeri

     

  • Which ground covers are recommended?

    Native ground covers:

    • Dietes bicolor
    • Dietes grandiflora
    • Hymenocallis littoralis
    • Hymenocallis speciosa
    • Lomandra hystrix

    Non-native ground covers:

    • Agapanthus orientalis
    • Evolvulus pilosus
    • Liriope sp.
    • Ophiopogon japonicus

You have the ability to improve the appearance of your neighbourhood. More people who take pride in the neighbourhood will improve the liveability of your area and your community.

Social: Streets where footpaths are planted with trees, shrubs or garden plantings, are more attractive and comfortable to walk around. There can be more social interaction between neighbours.

Environment: Additional planted areas on the footpath can improve bird habitats, reduce heating affects and improve storm water management.

Economic: Real estate values can be increased in areas with attractive streetscapes.

Pedestrian access must be available. The minimum requirement to be maintained in a typical residential street is 1200 mm. In higher traffic areas, there may be wider constructed paths provided. No impediments or trip hazards can be created within this space.

Ensure plantings will not impede visibility for pedestrians and vehicles. More stringent controls are in place near intersections.

There should be clear unobstructed areas where wheelie bins can be placed for collection. This area must be clear of trees and other obstacles. Buildings, fences or other solid structures are not able to be constructed within this public space.

Avoid species that have sharp leaves, fronds or thorns. Check that trees won’t drop large seed pods or limbs regularly. Trees above 2 metres are to be avoided.

If you plant species for fruit or other food production, you must understand that this remains a public place and it will not be possible to prevent others from taking from this space. Council will not enter into any disputes of this nature.

You can plant small trees, shrubs, grass, vegetables and ground covers. The application of mulch, fine decorative gravel or other suitable media can assist with water retention and reduce weed growth.

Use plants that match your soil type and climatic conditions. A list of suitable plant species is available on council’s website.

If non-local species are selected, consider varieties that are drought tolerant. Avoid plant species that are considered weeds, invasive in nature, easily spread by birds and animals or likely to damage infrastructure.

You may install in-ground irrigation at your own cost. The water charges will be at the property owner’s expense.

 

  • Plant small trees (maximum height 2 m), shrubs, groundcovers, grass or vegetables.
  • The use of mulch, fine gravel or other suitable media is recommended to reduce water.
  • Mow, trim and attend to your footpath regularly.
  • Encourage your neighbours to improve their footpaths.
  • Be a good neighbour and assist others to enhance your local area.
  • Seek assistance from family, friends or other support networks to maintain your footpath.

Native shrubs:

  • Baeckea Mt Tozer
  • Bauhinia galpinii Grevillea – Coconut Ice, Firesprite, Robyn Gordon and Superb varieties
  • Callistemon Little John
  • Eugenia reinwardtiana
  • Leptospermum flavescens – cardwell
  • Leptospermum petersonii
  • Melaleuca – Claret Tops
  • Melaleuca – Snowflake
  • Melaleuca bracteata cv.
  • Randia fitzalanii
  • Syzygium luehmannii
  • Westringia fruiticosa

Non-native shrubs:

  • Azelea sp.
  • Brunsfelsia latifolia
  • Clivia miniata
  • Codiaeum variegatum
  • Cordyline sp.
  • Cuphea hyssopifolia
  • Dracaena sp.
  • Gardenia augusta cv.
  • Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
  • Ixora – Coral Fire, Gold Fire, Pink Malay, Prince of Orange, Sunkist and Willamsii varieties
  • Murraya paniculata
  • Nadina domestica
  • Plumbago auriculata
  • Pleomele reflexa cv.
  • Raphiolepis indica
  • Spathiphyllum

Native trees:

  • Brachychiton acerifolia
  • Brachychiton ruperstris
  • Buckinghamia celsissima
  • Erythrina vespetillio
  • Euodia elleryana
  • Flindersia australis
  • Peltophorum pterocarpum
  • Syzygium australe Cv.
  • Waterhousia floribunda
  • Xanthostemon chysanthus

Non-native trees:

  • Plumeria obtusa
  • Cassia fistula
  • Lagerstromia speciosa
  • Plumeria sp.
  • Tabebuia argentea
  • Tabebuia palmeri

 

Native ground covers:

  • Dietes bicolor
  • Dietes grandiflora
  • Hymenocallis littoralis
  • Hymenocallis speciosa
  • Lomandra hystrix

Non-native ground covers:

  • Agapanthus orientalis
  • Evolvulus pilosus
  • Liriope sp.
  • Ophiopogon japonicus

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